Tanner Goods Camera Strap Review

Introduction:

There are so many camera straps available out there in many material types such as nylon or leather. Hopefully, this Tanner Goods leather camera strap review will be of use to you. Shortly after I purchased my first DLSR in 2014, I visited the recently opened Tanner Goods flagship store in Downtown LA. At the time, Tanner Goods was still using Horween Chromexcel as their primary leather with the colorways “Rich Moc”, “Chicago Tan”, “Dark Oak”, Black, and Natural. Every couple of years, Tanner Goods switches the leather on their goods to change things up. I had a hard time deciding between Chicago Tan and Rich Moc. I ended up purchasing the Rich Moc camera strap because I felt that the light brown tone would patina well. The Dark Oak was a medium brown and would have been a solid choice also. I liked the simple design of the strap and lack of “synthetic” materials (other than the nylon cords).

 

To me, Tanner Goods and Horween Leather come hand in hand. I feel that the brand’s success was because of their selection of leather, particularly Chromexcel, at an early time when not many other leather makers were using it. Nowadays, CXL is very prominent especially in footwear.

Details:

Tanner Goods SLR Camera Strap in “Rich Moc” Leather
Price: $130 USD

  • Made of 3.5oz Horween Chromexcel Leather
  • Attaches to camera via two high density nylon cords
  • Nonmetal hardware attachment reduces possibility of damage to camera
  • Easily detachable for tripod use
  • Burnished, waxed, and dyed by hand
  • Dimensions 36″ end to end
  • Made in the USA


Impressions:

The design of the camera strap is pretty innovative. It uses Tanner Goods’ signature belt loop and brass button stud attachment which is very secure. While many companies use a button stud, Tanner Goods went further to secure it using a leather loop so that unintended stress in any direction will not detach the leather. While I have no doubt that the button stud will stay secured, the leather loop adds that extra comfort of mind.


The main leather piece that sits on your neck or shoulder has 6 parallel slits on each side. The straps are connected to this piece by weaving through these slits alternatingly and then looping through itself to secure it. This placement allows the strap to occupy 3 of the 6 slots at a time. The camera strap initially comes with the straps at their longest (aka the lateral-most 3 slots of the 6). If you want to shorten the straps, you can remove them and position them in the slots more towards the center. Therefore, there are 4 potential positions to shorten/lengthen the strap. (654, 543, 432, 321).


I’ve carried a DSLR with a hefty lens without any problem or doubt. The main strap actually has a curved side which is supposed contour around your neck. Keep that in mind when you’re re-attaching the cords! Personally, it doesn’t make a difference to me whether the shoulder strap is facing the correct way as I carry the strap on my shoulder not neck.

I have tried to utilize the inner slots to shorten the strap length on several occasions but felt that in doing so, the main leather piece sticks out at its ends, making it look awkward. Also, it takes several minutes to adjust the straps, using the other side as a model to find out what loops through what. Ever since, I just leave it on the most longest position which is the most natural looking as the strap position allows the main shoulder/neck piece to completely curve. Moving to the straps shortest position only decreased the total length by about 4 inches!

The stitching and leather burnishing is very well done on the main leather piece. The lateral straps, however, do not have burnished edges which is one of my main irks. This leads to the straps having “fuzzy edges” which looks like a bad hairday! Perhaps the straps could not be burnished because of they were too thin.\

A trick that I used to get the nylon cord through my Fuji X-T10 was using dental floss to thread it through. On larger cameras, it is more practical to use O rings.

I love how easily the straps can detach so that it does not dangle in the way when on the tripod. Another technique is to to wrap the strap several times around my hand to prevent the strap flopping in front of my camera. The straps do not have any metal hardware that can scratch your camera. The nylon cords at the ends seem very securely riveted to the leather. But if anything were to fail first, it would probably be the nylon cords detaching.

Conclusion:

I nearly forgot about the MSRP of the Tanner Goods camera strap being $130. Even though the price was steep, it’s pretty much been the only camera strap I’ve used. I like the design and innovation of Tanner Goods being made of a material that ages gracefully. You can, however, find the straps lightly used on eBay for around $70-80. That’s a more affordable price!

The Rich Moc Chromexcel leather developed very prominent creases and perhaps even creased in an undesired looking manner. However, this creasing does not at all affect the durability of the product and is just cosmetic. The second Natural tooling camera strap that I also owned has darkened significantly in the places exposed.


The current leather that Tanner Goods uses is English Bridle Leather. I haven’t had much experience with that leather, but the design of the strap is still the same. One thing I love about Chromexcel is how soft it starts with. The Bridle Leather that I felt in person initially felt a lot more rigid and dry.

When I’m not using the camera or strap, it’s stored away safely in my Filson Photographer’s Backpack (check out that review here)!


3sixteen Type 3s Shadow Selvedge Denim Jacket Review

In 2014, the only 3sixteen piece I owned at the time was a pair of ST-120x in the shadow selvedge denim I had purchased and worn as my main denim since mid 2013. The shadow selvedge fades are phenomenal in their electric blue contrast. I remember purchasing the ST-120x at Self Edge SF on Valencia St in San Francisco, CA. I had set my eyes on this pair because @zvincler had a amazing faded SL-120x pair that was posted online.

Front View of the 3sixteen Type 3s Jacket

A few days after Thanksgiving in 2014, I had heard about Self Edge’s yearly sale where they discounted the % of the current year for all inventory. I can’t remember whether the Type 3s Shadow Selvedge jacket was released that F/W or if it was a year before that. Knowing how the same fabric faded, I decided to take purchase a size L at Self Edge LA. It was my first denim jacket with the detail of being a very dark indigo (nearly black) to start with. The price of “Black Friday’s Let’s Drink Sale” with 14% off came out to be $248.41.

Details

  • Fabric is 14.5oz Shadow Selvedge denim woven in Okayama, Japan (indigo warp and black weft threads)
  • Black corduroy cuff lining and pocketbags
  • Crossed back yoke with zigzag collar stitching
  • Inner leather patch made by Tanner Goods
  • Made in the USA

    Back View of 3sixteen Type 3s Jacket
    Back View of 3sixteen Type 3s Jacket

Initial Impressions/Fit

The shadow selvedge fabric is a very dark indigo with hues of purple. 3sixteen made a few changes from the “Type III” Trucker Jacket to make it their own. The body is slightly lengthened to make the look more modern, black corduroy lines the cuffs and pockets to make the jacket feel really comfortable, and the rear waist buttons and “cinch strap” were removed. In addition, 3sixteen added their signature crossed back yoke and zigzag stitching on the backside of the collar.

The jacket runs small and I had to size up one to a Large where I typically wore Mediums shirts/outerwear (referencing Uniqlo T shirts, Button-downs, and Outerwear) at the time. When I recently measured the pit-to-pit on my Large after a few years, it came out to 21.5 inches. An issue that I found with the jacket is that the sleeves ran short and the cuff size was way too small to button. I’m a pretty average sized dude – I’m 5’10 and about 170lbs. I pretty much always have to wear the cuffs unbuttoned even with just a T shirt underneath. Adding layers like a a wrist watch or a thicker flannel makes it even moreso uncomfortable to close.

The one cool detail about the jacket that I love is the “hidden” phone pocket that you can place your phone into on the inside behind the handwarmer pocket. The top chest pockets are too small to fit a phone without sticking out.

Secret interior phone pocket!
Secret interior phone pocket!
Chest pockets too small for a phone!
Chest pockets too small for a phone!

For the first year, I wore it on average 3-4 times a week. The fabric weight is great for SoCal – It’s a great jacket by itself anytime it’s 65-75 degrees, and maybe slightly lower if you pair it with a thick flannel. For a short while after purchasing the jacket, I wore both the shadow selvedge 120x denim and the jacket! Aka the “Shadow Selvedge Tuxedo”. I think I was comfortable pairing the both together because my jeans were quite faded already and top/bottom were different colors enough.

Quite a few people have asked how how many times I’ve washed it and by what method.  I waited about 4-5 months until I first washed it, never soaked it. I use the washing machine on a cold wash with a small amount of Woolite Darks to minimize the indigo loss and then line dry. The first time when I finally washed it, much of the contrast was revealed. The jacket shortened about an inch in the sleeve length, body length, and chest circumference. Owning it now for 3+ years, I may have washed it a of 12 times but lost count. Also shortly after my first wash, I was contacted by Andrew Chen and featured on 3sixteen’s Well Aged Type 3s Jacket!

Conclusion

Corduroy lined cuffs
Corduroy lined cuffs

I’d say the Type 3s jacket was one of my best outerwear purchases. At the current retail value of $265, it’s worth purchasing if you had to own only 1 denim jacket for the rest of your life. The shadow selvedge fabric is unique enough to recognize someone else wearing it as I have a couple times in downtown LA. The jacket was likely also my gateway purchase into pricier jackets such as 3sixteen’s FW releases in the coming years. Now that many other denim competitors have joined the market, I actually think 3sixteen’s expansion over the years was due to their outerwear starting with this jacket’s release. It’s now a staple item for their site and retailers and very rarely, if ever, goes on sale.

Electric blue fades near cuffs
Electric blue fades near cuffs
Most wear near handwarmer pockets
Most wear near handwarmer pockets
Leather patch fading through!
Leather patch fading through!
Crossed yoke back detail
Crossed yoke back detail
Thick Tanner Goods dark brown leather patch
Thick Tanner Goods dark brown leather patch
Elbow sleeve wear
Elbow sleeve wear
Front flat view
Front flat view
Honeycombs on arms
Honeycombs on arms

Tanner Goods Legacy Cardholder Wallet Review

Back when I started getting into menswear in 2011-2012, the most recommended wallet was a Saddleback ID card holder. I still have that very same one. Front pocket wallets that were slim had a huge popularity then. No one wanted a large bifold wallet that could potentially give you back pain in the long run!

The first time I was able to feel a Tanner Goods Cardholder wallet was at Unionmade’s flagship in San Francisco. I noticed that the current version was made with a full cover flap instead of an angled flap piece that I had seen online.

I purchased the Tanner Goods Legacy Cardholder in Chestnut Dublin leather sometime in early 2015 for about 85$. It was the first time TG brought back the “angled design” now calling it Legacy Cardholder. To me, the cardholder with the angled flap is the iconic Tanner Goods piece. The Dublin cardholder started with very interesting characteristics such as tiger striping. The dublin leather felt very similar to Chromexcel but seemed to have more variation.

 

What’s cool about the design is that it’s made from only two pieces of leather. On the rear side there are two wrap around leather pieces from where you can store folded bills. The interior can support up to about 15 cards and will still even stretch to accomodate more (depends on the leather). You can also place cash in the interior with a bill folded in half once in either orientation.

What I love: Simple and iconic design. Quality leather and hardware. Made in the USA.

Ehh: Takes time to get used to a cardholder (looking for credit card within the stack of cards) but all cardholders essentially have this problem. Bills have to be folded in an “undesired” way – either folded twice to fit in the back or folded once and creased on the edge.